StateBook International®

The Definitive Site for Site Selection

Broken Arrow Economic Development Corporation

210 North Main Street, Suite C
Broken Arrow, OK 74012
P: +1 918-893-2113

Overview

The downtown district of Broken Arrow began making an economic comeback in 2010 when the Broken Arrow Public Schools system opened a $30 million Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center at the south end of Main Street. The 1,500-seat theater has been a consistent draw, staging off-Broadway shows and concerts along with a variety of school-related productions. With such a high quality attraction in place, Broken Arrow officials in October 2012 decided to rename the downtown area Rose District, referring to Broken Arrow’s nickname long ago when it was known as “the city of roses and sparkling spring water.” Then in 2013, city leaders continued to ride the rejuvenation momentum by embarking upon a $3.7 million streetscaping project to beautify and further reinvigorate the district, largely by creating a more walkable environment with wider sidewalks and decorative lighting. The screetscaping effort also included reducing Main Street from four lanes to three lanes (two traffic lanes with a center turn lane) between Dallas and College streets. In addition, rose-filled planters and landscaping were added along the sidewalks to further enhance the Rose District theme. In addition to the Performing Arts Center, the district now features attractions such as a historical museum, a military history museum, and farmers' market pavilion. Officials say the ultimate goal for downtown Broken Arrow is to continue with an urban development theme that blends with the interesting historic buildings.
As Juliet said to Romeo, a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. But as Broken Arrow’s downtown Rose District proves, sometimes a name change – and a facelift – can make downtown city life much sweeter indeed. “In its heyday downtown had been the hub of the city, with many residents having fond memories of local merchants and service providers they frequented on Main Street, but many of those quaint businesses had long abandoned downtown,” says Lisa Frein, director of downtown development for the Broken Arrow Economic Development Corp. Faced with a once-vibrant downtown that had languished in the face of big box retailers and suburban growth, city leaders set about finding a way to capture some of the revenue being lost to nearby communities. The city’s population had grown by 30 percent over the past decade to 100,000 residents, most of them young, well-educated and with disposable income. But they were going to Tulsa and elsewhere for dining, shopping and entertainment with few local downtown options. Rose District Rehab After considerable community-wide discussion and planning, in 2013 the city launched a redevelopment project to create a three-block arts, entertainment, shopping and dining center along Main Street, naming it the Rose District after Broken Arrow’s "City of Roses" nickname. A $4 million budget included rezoning to allow public events in the area, narrowing the street from four to two lanes to make the district pedestrian-friendly, widening sidewalks to facilitate outdoor dining and meet ADA standards, creating mid-block crossing to allow easier access to shops, and dramatic streetscape improvements that included landscaping, especially rose plantings, new lighting and more. The project was completed at the end of 2013 and has already had a major impact on the city. “The infrastructure improvements came out looking great and now you’re seeing more bars and restaurants come in and more people coming down to shop and eat,” says Jason Scarpa, owner of Main Street Tavern, a fixture in the area for several years, and Roof Top Bar, which recently opened. "The city did an amazing job pulling off this project," he says. "It’s a place that Broken Arrow should be really proud of. It’s a place where people want to be.” Sweet Smell of Success Since the rehab of the district was announced in 2012, Frein says, about 15 new businesses have opened or plan to open, joining such longstanding business neighbors as Nouveau – Atelier de Chocolat and Star Jewelers. Sales tax revenues from the district have increased by 33 percent, and the occupancy rate has grown from 70-75 percent to 90-95 percent. In time, the city hopes to expand the district south and north, introduce new events, and enhance bike and walking trails to make downtown even more attractive. In the meantime, everything is coming up roses in the district these days. “It’s a perfect place for a ladies' brunch, family lunch after church, a date night meal before a show at the PAC or drinks after, guys' night out to watch the game, or a stroll through the shops on a Saturday afternoon after visiting the farmers market,” Frein says. “The Rose District is a gathering place for anyone – with something for everyone.”

Theater

With a professional and exciting atmosphere, the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center is the cornerstone of the arts district in downtown Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, and continues to be the premier venue for major performances from across the nation. With its doors opening in the summer of 2009, the BAPAC started on the right track in bringing Broadway tours, pop concerts, speciality shows and various other events to the area, while also acting as the official location for Broken Arrow Public Schools fine arts programs.

Museums

The Museum Broken Arrow was created by the Broken Arrow Historical Society to preserve the local history of the city and its residents and to serve as an educational opportunity for future generations. It hosts many events for residents and participates in the city's annual Rooster Days festival. There is something for locals and visitors alike to learn and enjoy atThe Museum Broken Arrow. The Museum is a proud member of the Oklahoma Museums Association.Exhibits in The Museum tell the story of local and regional history through artifacts and interactive story boards. A few original spaces can be found in the museum including the Old Town Hall Jail Cell and Childers Cabin. The first floor welcomes you in with rotating special exhibits and the gift shop filled with "Made in Oklahoma" gifts such as shirts, food and educational books. On the second floor visitors will find the main gallery with all of The Museum's permanent exhibits from the 'Broken Aro' Coal Tipple to theKaty Railroad Depot. Step back in time to the Broken Arrow Main Street during the oil boom's heyday. Come back to the museum to host a meeting or celebration in our rental space,3rd Floor @ The Museum, and take in the view overlooking downtown Broken Arrow.The Museum Broken Arrow HistoryThe Museum was constructed on a site donated by AVB Bank to the City of Broken Arrow for the purpose of building a museum. Before statehood, the site was the location of the historic Kentucky Colonel Hotel. The current building's facade replicates some of the features found on the historic hotel, razed in 1955.Funding for construction came from a combination of bond issues, private and corporate donations. The location in historic downtown Broken Arrow puts the Museum near the site of the original Katy Train Depot, an important part of Broken Arrow's history.

Data Name Value
Accredited Museums None
Arts Institutions 33
Dance Companies 1
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 1
Wagoner County, OK 0
Historical Sites 1
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 1
Wagoner County, OK 0
Museums 11
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 11
Wagoner County, OK 0
Musical Groups and Artists 14
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 14
Wagoner County, OK 0
Other Performing Arts Companies 0
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 0
Wagoner County, OK 0
Theater Companies and Dinner Theaters 6
Name Count
Tulsa County, OK 6
Wagoner County, OK 0